Lazarus of Bethany

July 29th is the Western Feast Day of Lazarus of Bethany. You have probably heard of him. He rose from the dead in the Gospel of John. You could observe this by turning over a new leaf, or maybe a boiled ham dinner? No wait, that’s Easter. I don’t know, I am sure you’ll figure something out.

Christ’s raising of Lazarus, Athens, 12–13th century

Johnny Flynn, Raising the Dead

George Bradshaw

Cartographer and printer George Bradshaw was born on July 29, 1800. He published a weekly magazine called Bradshaw’s Journal: A Miscellany of Literature, Science and Art as well as Bradshaw’s Guide, a combined railway guide and timetables.

Bradshaw’s Continental Railway Guide, 1891

Keep Your Pants On

Saint  Pantaleon, Saint Catherine’s Monastery, Mount Sinai, 13th century

I really dropped the ball on July 27th, but it is the Catholic Feast Day of Saint Pantaleon, Martyr of Nicomedia (modern day Turkey). He is the Patron Saint of physicians, apothecaries, midwives, livestock, the lottery and lottery winners, called on against headaches, consumption, locusts, witchcraft, accidents, and loneliness, and helper for crying children. Possibly, his name is involved in the origin of the word pants.

That is quite a to-do list. Now I really don’t feel like I have the flimsiest excuse for not getting through mine today, although I did help a crying child (though my own of course, so that probably doesn’t count either). Oh well. Hope you bought a lottery ticket!

Pantalone, by Maurice Sand

Twinkle Twinkle Little Bat

I had a great many more things to say about July 26, but as usual, I started too late. In conclusion, Walt Disney’s Alice in Wonderland today premiered in 1951. I don’t know about you but the little dormouse perfectly sums up my energy right now. Good night.